We’re still looking at how we can best deliver an authentic Classic experience at launch, and in the weeks and months that follow - both in terms of gameplay and community. You won’t see phasing (which is tied to specific quests that don't exist in Classic) or cross-realm zones (which combine multiple realms together) in Classic. However, realm sharding is one of the best tools we have to keep realms stable when hundreds of players are swarming the same initial few zones and killing the same few mobs (like they will be at the launch of Classic). To that end, we do believe that some form of sharding may be helpful, especially in those early days. But we recognize that a cohesive world is critical to WoW Classic and are committed to bringing that to you. Layering in Classic WoW
Apparently a lot of the current World of Warcraft Classic closed beta testers are reporting things as bug that, well, simply aren't. There are enough of them, in fact, that Kalvax, the Classic community manager, posted a lengthy "Not a Bug" list on the forums. Some of the things that are actual features in the game include Tauren melee reach and hitboxes are larger than other races, Warrior health regen is working as intended and creature respawn rates are "much slower".
The Legion Fishing Artifact, Underlight Angler (Patch 7.3.5) Join fellow fisherman in Legion by obtaining the new fishing artifact! This guide will give a detailed walk-through showing you how to get the artifact. Mounts and Companions from Professions A comprehensive guide on how to make all the mounts and craft all the companions using the in-game professions. Battle for Azeroth Cooking Guide This guide covers all of the World of Warcraft Battle for Azeroth Cooking additions and changes, including new foods and how to obtain recipes. Battle for Azeroth Enchanting Guide This guide covers all of the World of Warcraft Battle for Azeroth Enchanting additions and changes, including new items and special Enchanting-only perks.
With the Classic beta now out it seems every related article somehow manages to spark the eternal war of "Vanilla was the best WoW sucks now" and "lol nostalgia goggles, Vanilla sucked, enjoy your two weeks of Classic". I have to say, even though I understand the principles behind the battle and the reasons people behave and talk this way... I actually REALLY don't get it on a deeper level.
Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1

It was the experience of the game that brought pleasure and joy, and that's what a lot of us want again. Not the numbers. When I play Classic I want to go through the deadmines with people I like and overcome a challenge together and see myself become stronger as a result. I don't want to play Classic so I can say "booyah! That number is exactly the same as it was 13 years ago!"
You create a meta where you're constantly buying gold. Gold is very important in vanilla consumables are the difference between being a hardcore raider and being a casual. The notion that wow token doesn't create inflation is incorrect. By giving every player the ability to buy gold you're increasing how much gold your average player will have. the 1% rich player who has the ingame gold to buy these tokens was not trading with that gold. But now they buy ingame time and the gold that was sitting in their pocket is now being used to trade, buy items, herbs, etc. now there's more gold in circulation. Now everything costs a little bit more gold. And if you're a player who's not buying wow tokens with real life money you have to farm just a little bit longer to compete. That's why wow token is bad.
This is, in my opinion, the largest change that WoW Classic will have over Vanilla, and it’s something that simply can’t be undone. Back in Vanilla, guilds were very secretive over strategies of how to correctly defeat a boss. Videos of boss kills were virtually non-existent,and strategies on how to itemize and play various classes and specs were hard to come by, especially for newer players. This, in addition to the unforgiving raid requirements and difficult content, lead to a lot of the player base never really getting to see a lot of the endgame content. Those that did rarely ever did so efficiently, and it wasn’t uncommon for the best guild on any given server to take months to complete a raid tier. There is absolutely no way that this happens in Classic. The raids in Vanilla are very much a solved system by now. Every raid, and every boss and trash pack inside, has been thoroughly strategized and talked about to death over the last 14 years. Rest assured even if you and your friends never played Vanilla, someone in your raid party will know exactly what to do on every boss, exactly when the trash packs are going to respawn, and exactly what buffs and gear to get to prepare. That certainly doesn’t mean thatClassic raiding will be a cakewalk, but it will be different than how the majority of people stumbled through the content.

Dec 28, 2016 Better Living through Technology!(new2macros) *note: this guide is for people who haven't used macros or advanced keybinds and want to try. Macros are basically 'super buttons' that you can create in order to use multiple abilities and spells from the same button. This means even if you have 15 different abilities, you can key them all to 3-5 buttons. With macros you can do things like: 1) have all your buff spells on one button 2) 'hide' abilities that you don't use very often so they only show when you need them 3) 'group' similar abilities so that, for example, all your commonly used melee skills are on one button 4) maximize your rotation so that you're always one step ahead of the GCD Macros are great, but there are a few limitations: 1) complicated! -learning macros takes a good chunk of time. It's only something I've been able to do since my work gives me some 'free time' to cruise the UI/macro forum. 2) software limited -While very powerful, there is potential to abuse macros so that, for example, you could hit one button and your character would kill every mob in range (eventually). This potential for abuse has cause blizzard to put some powerful limitations on macros. More about this later. 3) the One Button rule -each macro button can use only one ability each time you press the button. You can code this so that it will use a different ability each and every time you press it (and on a different target!), but you can't press the button once and, for example, have it cast all 5 self buffs on you. I don't even know where to start?! To get started with macros, it's very simple. Just log on WoW and type /m. This brings up your macro box, where you just have to hit 'new' and the game will prompt for a name and an icon. I recommend that you leave the icon as a question mark. (?) The question mark means the game will automatically pick up the picture of the ability that the macro will use. My First Macro For your first macro lets just replace a normal ability you use on your bar in combat. I'm going to use paladin abilities here, but you can replace them with whatever ability you like. So to make my first macro, I went to the /m menu in game, picked a new macro, and gave it the question mark icon. Then I click on the icon, click on the empty box, and type: /cast This is the basic core of every macro. It's basically like the verb in a sentence. You can use different 'verbs' (called slash commands) but this is probably the most popular. Since I want this macro to cast Hammer of the Righteous, I simple type that in after the /cast. /cast Hammer of the Righteous And pow! I'm done! If you drag this onto your bar and hit it a million times, you basically have the paladin protection spec in a nutshell (lol). However this doesn't really give you any extra functionality over a normal keybind. The next thing I'm going to do is make the macro heal a friendly if I have a friendly targeted, or if it's an enemy it will use SotR (shield of the righteous). To do this you add a conditional. This says 'only cast this spell if 'X' is true.' It looks like this (with a breakdown of the macro underneath): /cast [help] Word of Glory; [harm] Shield of the Righteous \__/ \____/\__________/\/ \____/\__________________/ verb-conditional---|---separator|----------------| -------------------ability---------conditional----Ability What this macro will do is check the status of your current target. A 'friendly'(help) value will cause my paladin to heal the target. An 'enemy'(harm) value will trigger the attack ability. If you can grasp macros thus far, you've already learned enough to make macros useful for you. Putting this on your bar will basically cut the number of keybinds you need by 1. Modifier macro commands Another handy feature you can use with macros is called a Modifier. This may sound familiar but it's possible to set a macro so that it will use a different ability or spell if you hold down control, alt, or shift. Here's a basic example: /cast [mod:alt] Seal of Truth;[mod:ctrl] Blessing of Kings;[mod:shift] Righteous Fury; Seal of Insight If you had this macro bound to 1, and you press 1, it would cast Seal of truth (and the seal picture would be on the keybind). Pressin ctrl would change the icon to blessing of kings and would cast blessing of kings if you pressed ctrl-1, etc....Raygecow149 Dec 28, 2016

Since WoW Classic server has been announced at Blizzcon 2017, there is not much info about the server revealed. It is known that the upcoming expansion Battle for Azeroth pre-order has been available at blizzard shop, and the system requirements of Mac and Windows has been unveiled Recently, Forbes has an interview with J. Allen Brack and Jeremy Feasel about the project and some of the vision that developers have.


Kaivax, a WoW forum community manager, revealed that WoW Classic's class design, battleground mechanics and stats on existing items will be set to their 1.12 state, despite the game releasing content that expands beyond that. This removes "progressive itemization," so if the stats on a specific piece of equipment was changed during the original updates, that won't take effect in this version.
And for talent builds. I prefer to make my own talent builds. But I've been playing RPGs since the 8bit days so half the fun is building my own characters up. I already made and bookmarked 1 deep fire mage build, 2 elemental mage builds, and 2 deep frost mage builds. And I might remake them tomorrow if I read up on any good talent choices I left out my 1st 5 times lol. And I have multiple builds for the other classes I play too.
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